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Op-Ed Columns

‘Walk With the Wind …’

By CONNIE SCHULTZ What a moment in America. On Thursday, three former U.S. presidents — George W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama — walked into Atlanta’s storied Ebenezer Baptist Church to deliver tributes to civil rights icon John Lewis, who died on July 17 at age 80. Earlier this ...

Who is really burning things down?

By MONA CHAREN My friend David French, one of the most admirable voices in America today, argues that conservatives need not vote against Republican senate candidates in order to send a message about Trumpism. I disagree. He writes, “A rage, fury, and a ‘burn it all down’ mentality is ...

Difficult decisions

By 
Dr. Karissa L. Niehoff The numbers in high school activity programs are staggering — 8 million participants in sports, 4 million students in performing arts, 500,000 coaches and officials and 300 million-plus fans at contests throughout the school year.  Whether as a participant, ...

Political dissent and freedom

By JUDGE ANDREW NAPOLIANO Two weeks ago, this column offered a brief history of the freedom of speech in America. The essence of the column was that all public speech is lawful when there is time for more speech to challenge it and that the remedy for hate speech is not censorship, but ...

By any other name

By CAL THOMAS Politicians and various social justice groups have long used labels that have nothing to do with the real intent of legislation, or an organization, to dupe the public. But, to paraphrase Shakespeare, a rose by any other name is still a rose. Numerous “civil rights” bills ...

End the Marxism love affair

By LAURA HOLLIS I watched director Agnieszka Holland’s award-winning film “Mr. Jones” this week. It’s truly outstanding, a quiet masterpiece about the young Welsh journalist Gareth Jones who risked his life to expose what is now called the Holomodor, the 1932-33 famine in Ukraine ...

Losing the global dating game

By Rachel Marsden The U.S. won over the hearts and minds of other nations in the Cold War era because they looked America up and down and decided they wanted a piece of what was on offer — namely, its wallet, er, “values.” But now, as the U.S. resorts to threatening allies to maintain ...

Land of plenty sinks into anxiety

By FROMA HARROP A friend and I shared the same consumer frustration — and guilt over having it. We each wanted a bike rack for our cars but could not obtain our first choices. “I wanted to order a 1UP bike rack,” my pal, who used to manufacture sports equipment, said. “Sold out and ...

Crowded bars face crackdowns

Newsday, July 28 Must be nice to forget about the pandemic. That’s the only explanation for what happened among the crowd of people who appeared close to a stage and not social-distanced in a video of a Saturday Water Mill charity concert, which included performances from electronic music ...

Supreme Court, Congress & Trump

By Jules Witcover As opinion polls foresee an electoral defeat for President Donald Trump in November, leaders of the two other federal branches are increasingly emerging as challengers to his primacy here in the capital city. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has been a political thorn in his ...

Don’t hand out vaccines based on race

By BETSY MCCAUGHEY A federal committee is considering pushing Blacks, Hispanics and Native Americans to the front of the line for COVID-19 vaccines, ahead of whites. A COVID-19 vaccine could be ready by year’s end but not in sufficient quantity to vaccinate over 300 million Americans. ...

Roger Stone now owns the GOP

By Jonah Goldberg Roger Stone is an infamously execrable force in American politics. Perhaps his only saving grace is that he’s not a hypocrite about it. Stone is a proud “dirty trickster.” The GOP kept him on a leash lest his amorality be too closely associated with the Republican ...

Can Trump pull a Truman?

By PATRICK J. BUCHANAN On July 22, 1988, after the Democratic National Convention in Atlanta, the party nominee, Gov. Michael Dukakis, enjoyed a 17-point lead over Vice President George W. Bush. Five weeks later, on Labor Day, Dukakis was down eight points, the same margin by which he would ...

Despicable behavior of today’s academicians

By WALTER E. WILLIAMS The Michigan State University administration pressured professor Stephen Hsu to resign from his position as vice president of research and innovation because he touted research that found police are not more likely to shoot black Americans. The study found: “The race ...

Stay away from S.C.

By KATHLEEN PARKER At times like this, I’m tempted to dig out my father’s doormat, which bore the words: “Go away.” A dedicated misanthrope, he at least maintained a sense of humor. Today, as South Carolina’s COVID-19 infection rate skyrockets, there’s not much to chuckle about. ...

The double-edged sword

By DIANE DIMOND On the television crime drama “FBI,” Special Agent Jubal Valentine brusquely orders an underling to run a photograph through facial recognition to identify a suspect. Boom! After a rocket-speed search, the computer spits out a name and address. Field agents get to work, ...

Mark Zuckerberg is right

By RICH LOWRY Mark Zuckerberg clearly hasn’t gotten the memo. The founder of Facebook persists in defending free expression, even though free speech has fallen decidedly out of fashion. His reward for adhering to what once would have been a commonsensical, if not banal, view of the ...

Some statutes of limitations should be removed

For months since the late Dr. Richard Strauss’ misdeeds at Ohio State University surfaced, people have wondered how he got away with it for so long. While serving as a doctor for OSU athletic teams during the 1990s, Strauss sexually abused hundreds of young men. Some of them complained at ...

The guessing game

By KATHLEEN PARKER The mystery of Joe Biden’s running mate takes me back to 2008, when the political world breathlessly awaited John McCain’s surprise pick. Back then, the whispered word was that Democrat-turned-independent Joe Lieberman was McCain’s top choice. But the powers that ...

Personal liberty squeezed in a vice

By JUDGE ANDREW NAPOLITANO Last week, this column addressed the expectation of revolution and the exhilaration of freedom that pervaded the 13 colonies during the summer of 1776. This summer in America, we are approaching the end of a civilized and free society as we have known it. The ...