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Editorials

An unusual conversation

By Cal Thomas Which of the following would you consider the most unusual and least likely to occur? 1) President Trump calls Speaker Nancy Pelosi to invite her to lunch. 2) Rioters and looters agree to pay for the damage they caused to businesses and individuals. 3) Conservative talk ...

Sweden backtracking on cure

By FROMA HARROP Sweden offered hope that the coronavirus could be reined in without great inconvenience or economic pain. Unlike its neighbors in Scandinavia and elsewhere, Sweden didn’t put its people in strict lockdown. Restaurants, bars and shops buzzed with their usual customers. Gyms ...

Officials should take note

Local and state officials reveling in their power to enforce dictates they claim are needed to battle the coronavirus pandemic may well have felt a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling upheld their authority. In a way, it did. But look more closely at the ruling: It came in an emergency appeal ...

We need to help our neighbors

President Donald Trump’s announcement that he is cutting U.S. funding for the World Health Organization has been condemned throughout the world. Critics insist that a healthy WHO is essential especially now, as the COVID-19 pandemic rages. But the question is whether the WHO, a United ...

Nightmare on Main Street

By KATHLEEN PARKER You may choose to look the other way, but you can never again say that you did not know. — William Wilberforce Everyone has had some version of this nightmare: You forget to study for an exam or write a paper that’s due in the morning — or, you are ...

We have a rotten tree here

By Leonard Pitts After George Floyd became the latest unarmed African American killed by police. After cars were overturned and cities were burned. After armies of angry people filled our streets with raw screams. After all that, a white man with an impressive title went on CNN to ...

Protestors’ message getting lost by rioters

Sometimes we wish we could “rewind” something we have just seen, because we can’t believe our eyes. What we thought we saw can’t be what really happened, we reason. Dozens of times during the past week or so, the media has permitted us to take another look at what occurred March 25 ...

Time is running out

About 156.5 million Americans are categorized as members of the civilian labor force. At least 41 million people who can work and by definition want to are unemployed. In other words, approximately one of every four people able to work is not employed — and is being supported by the rest. ...

Integrity to be proud of

Plenty of the headlines these days are Bad news with a capital “B.” What seems to be going on all around us is disheartening, to say the least. An occasional ray of sunshine breaks through, however. Consider the national spelling bee: Earlier this year, organizers of the annual Scripps ...

Agreement must be non-negotiable

While we Americans were paying tribute to our fallen heroes during Memorial Day weekend, observant Muslims here and abroad were marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan. Even in Afghanistan, there was a pause in hostilities between government and Taliban forces. It came as U.S. and ...

A challenge for educators

Many school districts and individual teachers have contingency plans for classes to be interrupted for a few days. We doubt more than a handful had strategies for the current situation, in which the last couple of months of school for millions of students was canceled. There is evidence many ...

What the FBI did to Michael Flynn was wrong

Regardless of our political leanings, what happened to Michael Flynn should concern every American. While we should insist on details about his case, a more important question needs to be answered: How many other people have been treated similarly by the FBI and other law enforcement ...

One Twitter mob at a time

By BEN SHAPIRO Life is filled with nuance, with complexity. Take, for example, the case of Amy Cooper. Cooper is a 41-year-old white woman who worked at Franklin Templeton, an asset management firm. She was walking her dog without a leash in the Ramble section of Central Park when she was ...

U.S. is more ready for germ attack

By BETSY MCCAUGHEY America hasn’t seen the last of killer coronaviruses. China’s “bat woman,” a Wuhan Institute of Virology investigator who handles bat viruses, is warning that the current pandemic is “just the tip of the iceberg.” Friendly advice from a researcher? Perhaps, ...

Bird-watching while black

By MONA CHAREN A lifelong bird-watcher ventured into a section of New York’s Central Park, the “Ramble,” at 7:30 a.m., hoping to catch a glimpse of waterfowl. In previous days, he had spied scarlet tanagers, ovenbirds and mourning warblers. On Memorial Day, as he waited quietly, an ...

Lives can be saved by tests

Once the grim tally of deaths from COVID-19 is finalized — sometime later this year, we hope — there is little doubt it will be clear that nursing homes are the coronavirus’ favored killing grounds. To most public health leaders, that already is obvious. In some states, most of the ...

COVID-19 to 2020 elections

By STAR PARKER With the House passage of Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s $3 trillion Heroes Act, COVID-19 policy has now officially transformed into presidential politics 2020. Let’s recall that prior to the crisis, the nation appeared quite pleased with the leadership that President Donald ...

Biden needs black voters

By Jules Witcover Democratic presidential front-runner Joe Biden appears to have sustained a self-inflicted political wound by telling a black radio host that African Americans considering voting for Donald Trump “ain’t black.” He apparently was referring to his record on civil ...

Failing dams needs to be addressed

About 11,000 people were forced to leave their Central Michigan homes a few days ago, when two large dams failed. No lives were lost, in part because the dams’ imminent failure had been anticipated for several days, as a result of heavy rainfall. In fact, concern about the dams dates back ...

A vice president that could work

By GEORGE F. WILL The smallest state has a small governor. Rhode Island’s Gina Raimondo is almost 5 feet 3 inches, about an inch shorter than James Madison. What was said of him is true of her: There is a high ratio of mind to mass. Unfortunately, a perversity of today’s political culture ...