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Editorials

Disenchanted voters

Complaints about voter disenfranchisement often have more to do with incompetence than partisan scheming, we suspect. This year’s primary election in Georgia appears to be a case in point. Voters reported lengthy delays and other problems in many of the state’s 159 counties last Tuesday. ...

At a crossroads

People like Derek Chauvin need to be kept out of law enforcement. When they manage to elude safeguards with that as a goal, they need to be identified and booted out of the profession. And when law enforcement brutality does occur, it simply must be punished swiftly and severely. All that ...

We must never forget the evil that existed

No one knows with certainty how many human beings — men, women and children — were forced to stand on the 800-pound stone that remained planted in the ground on a street corner in Fredericksburg, Virginia for 176 years. What we do know is that each and every one of them was treated like an ...

Go after the bad apples

Use of excessive force by law enforcement personnel is a problem that transcends race, as a video shot a few days ago in Buffalo, New York makes clear. Taken by a television news crew, the video shows Buffalo police responding to a demonstration in the city’s Niagara Square. Like so many ...

Going in the right direction

Prosecutors in Minnesota last Wednesday made the right move by broadening the reach of their efforts in the wake of the killing of George Floyd. Now the three officers who stood by and watched Derek Chauvin press his knee into Floyd’s neck until he stopped breathing have been charged with ...

Economic ‘normal’ is not in the near future

As the nation began the process of “reopening” slowly but, we all hope, safely, there was encouraging news on the economic front. About two weeks ago, nearly 25 million Americans were receiving unemployment benefits, the Labor Department reported. By Thursday, the number had decreased to ...

Law and order is not fascist

By RICH LOWRY Confronted by a clear and present fascist threat, the staff of The New York Times rose up last week to humiliate and punish quislings in its ranks. In a now famous op-ed, Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton called for federal troops to quell riots and looting, an idea that the Times ...

Will home farming survive a vaccine?

By FROMA HARROP Farm-to-table refers to freshly grown produce — that is, fruits and vegetables not transported from some distant time zone or even hemisphere but recently harvested on boutique acreage just outside town. The foodie media trumpet the virtues of local food sources, and their ...

A gift to ciminals

Calls for massive “defunding” of law enforcement are simply insane. When political correctness addles our brains to the point we fail to recognize the critical need we have for the “thin blue line” to safeguard us from crime, we Americans will be in real, imminent danger. Yet some ...

An unusual conversation

By Cal Thomas Which of the following would you consider the most unusual and least likely to occur? 1) President Trump calls Speaker Nancy Pelosi to invite her to lunch. 2) Rioters and looters agree to pay for the damage they caused to businesses and individuals. 3) Conservative talk ...

Sweden backtracking on cure

By FROMA HARROP Sweden offered hope that the coronavirus could be reined in without great inconvenience or economic pain. Unlike its neighbors in Scandinavia and elsewhere, Sweden didn’t put its people in strict lockdown. Restaurants, bars and shops buzzed with their usual customers. Gyms ...

Officials should take note

Local and state officials reveling in their power to enforce dictates they claim are needed to battle the coronavirus pandemic may well have felt a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling upheld their authority. In a way, it did. But look more closely at the ruling: It came in an emergency appeal ...

We need to help our neighbors

President Donald Trump’s announcement that he is cutting U.S. funding for the World Health Organization has been condemned throughout the world. Critics insist that a healthy WHO is essential especially now, as the COVID-19 pandemic rages. But the question is whether the WHO, a United ...

Nightmare on Main Street

By KATHLEEN PARKER You may choose to look the other way, but you can never again say that you did not know. — William Wilberforce Everyone has had some version of this nightmare: You forget to study for an exam or write a paper that’s due in the morning — or, you are ...

We have a rotten tree here

By Leonard Pitts After George Floyd became the latest unarmed African American killed by police. After cars were overturned and cities were burned. After armies of angry people filled our streets with raw screams. After all that, a white man with an impressive title went on CNN to ...

Protestors’ message getting lost by rioters

Sometimes we wish we could “rewind” something we have just seen, because we can’t believe our eyes. What we thought we saw can’t be what really happened, we reason. Dozens of times during the past week or so, the media has permitted us to take another look at what occurred March 25 ...

Time is running out

About 156.5 million Americans are categorized as members of the civilian labor force. At least 41 million people who can work and by definition want to are unemployed. In other words, approximately one of every four people able to work is not employed — and is being supported by the rest. ...

Integrity to be proud of

Plenty of the headlines these days are Bad news with a capital “B.” What seems to be going on all around us is disheartening, to say the least. An occasional ray of sunshine breaks through, however. Consider the national spelling bee: Earlier this year, organizers of the annual Scripps ...

Agreement must be non-negotiable

While we Americans were paying tribute to our fallen heroes during Memorial Day weekend, observant Muslims here and abroad were marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan. Even in Afghanistan, there was a pause in hostilities between government and Taliban forces. It came as U.S. and ...

A challenge for educators

Many school districts and individual teachers have contingency plans for classes to be interrupted for a few days. We doubt more than a handful had strategies for the current situation, in which the last couple of months of school for millions of students was canceled. There is evidence many ...