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B-P Bullying stance is about ‘Zero Tolerance’

Broadalbin-Perth third-grader Johnny Stamatakis winds up to fire a pencil point through balloons at the Burst the Bullying table during the anti-bullying harvest festival Saturday at the middle school. (The Leader-Herald/Eric Retzlaff)

BROADALBIN — “Zero tolerance” is what Matina Stamatakis likes about Broadalbin-Perth School District’s policy on bullying.

“If there is bullying, they nip it in the bud,” she said at an anti-bullying carnival at the middle school Saturday.

Meanwhile youngsters played games with anti-bullying names. Her third-grade son Johnny fired sharpened pencils at balloons at a booth labeled Burst the Bullying.

The event was meant to address bullying, while kids were also having fun, and to raise funds for school and community activities. That’s why middle school Principal Wayne Bell didn’t mind having his face covered with whipped cream at a booth where youths smushed him with cream-laden paper plates.

Bell said he was very happy with the turnout for an event about bullying that also highlighted the district’s effort to combat it. He thinks the carnival, which was a joint effort of students, teachers and staffers, will be even bigger next year.

The Leader-Herald/Eric Retzlaff Sixth-grader Celeste Smith buys trinkets at a table staffed by Edward Young, also in the sixth grade, and school counselor Jennifer Steele during the anti-bullying harvest festival Saturday at Broadalbin-Perth Middle School.

Besides the food and music, youths were treated to a variety of games in the semicircular area in front of the school. Luke Tambasco, an eighth-grader, repeatedly walloped a Striker with a mallet to hit a 10-foot bell.

Sixth-graders Haley Tomlinson and Alix Shrom tried their hand at tossing ping pong balls into cups of water. “It’s exciting because it’s for a good cause,” said Shrom, who scored two out of three.

Madison Samek, a first-grader, was running the Bully Free Slime table at which containers of a Play-Doh-like substance were sold. It took students in the intermediate school’s entrepreneur club two hours to make the concoction and fill 50 containers.

Seventh-grader Hollie Wilson and Stephanie Hotaling, a school counselor, sold “It’s Cool to be Kind” shortsleeve shirts that were designed by eighth-grader Harley Dopp. Since many people working at the festival were wearing these shirts, the saying was clearly the theme of the day.

“We’re trying to all unite together to make a statement against bullying,” said Hotaling.

The Leader-Herald/Eric Retzlaff Seventh-grader shows off shirts with the motto "It's Cool to Be Kind" for sale during the anti-bullying harvest festival Saturday at Broadalbin Perth Middle School.

Eighth-grader Makayla Hodsoll used a grabbing device blindfolded to snag plastic ducks in the Duck, Duck Bully game. “I feel like bullying should never happen because it is disrespectful to other people,” she said.

Celeste Smith, a sixth-grader, was buying trinkets at a table managed by school counselor Jennifer Steele and sixth-grader Edward Young.

Other children were using the bouncy house, knocking down bowling pins and playing several other games. Some boys were just throwing around a football.

“This is an awesome event,” said Robert Fisher, father of four daughters.

Music was provided by DJ Scotty Entertainment of Amsterdam.

The Leader-Herald/Eric Retzlaff First-grader Madison Samek watches over the Bully Free Slime made by the intermediate school Entrepreneur Club for sale during the anti-bullying harvest festival Saturday at Broadalbin-Perth Middle School. The concoction can be molded like Play-Doh.

The Leader-Herald/Eric Retzlaff Broadalbin-Perth Middle School Principal Wayne Bell lets himself taregted with whipped cream from students during the anti-bullying harvest festival Saturday at the middle school. Proceeds from the event will help the school and community.

The Leader-Herald/Eric Retzlaff Makayla Hodsoll, a Broadalbin-Perth eighth-grader, fishes blindfolded at the Duck, Duck Bully game during the anti-bullying harvest festival Saturday at the middle school.

The Leader-Herald/Eric Retzlaff Alix Shrom, right, tosses a ping pong ball into cups while fellow sixth-grader waits her turn during the anti-bullying harvest festival Saturday at Broadalbin-Perth Middle School..

The Leader-Herald/Eric Retzlaff Eighth-grader Luke Tambasco swings to hit the 10-foot bell on the Striker during the anti-bullying harvest festival Saturday at Broadalbin-Perth Middle School.

The Leader-Herald/Eric Retzlaff A crowd of students and adults participate in the anti-bullying harvest festival Saturday at Broadalbin-Perth Middle School.

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