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Should New York state pay bonuses of up to $20,000 to teachers who rate "highly effective" on their evaluations, as Gov. Cuomo has proposed?

  1. Yes
  2. No
 
 
 
 
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Comments

(73)

FedUp0416

Jan-15-14 2:15 PM

Another bonus for teachers? I don't think so. They are already extremely OVER COMPENSATED with cash, time off and retirement benefits. What a ridiculous notion!

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Patriot1

Jan-15-14 2:31 PM

"Highly effective" does not necessarily imply that objective evaluation has occurred. This would be an extremely flawed process which would undoubtedly create simmering resentment in any school and lead to really effective teachers leaving that school when they were not properly evaluated. This is an idea which should be consigned to the nearest sewer. Favoritism exists at all levels.

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revoltnow

Jan-15-14 2:39 PM

are you kidding me.. how bout fine the ones that don't do there job's....

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rocky1

Jan-15-14 3:34 PM

In theory it sounds great, but as far as in practice, Patriot has it right! How about we drop the mandates and let the teachers do the job they were hired to do?! That's all they want.

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Stackrat

Jan-15-14 4:16 PM

Whats wrong with the salary they already receive? Why are teachers so special? How about daycare providers, Mothers, babysitters and next door neighbors? REALLY?!!!

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MrBoB51

Jan-15-14 4:16 PM

The State might want to pay these bonus's but other than here, who in*****is asking the TAXPAYER who foots these multi-million promises? This liberal in Albany has got to stop issuing checks we cant pay. NYS is open for business alright, the business of sticking it to the remaining Taxpayers.

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JoePhillip

Jan-15-14 5:01 PM

Ask this question of any "highly effective" teacher (quotation marks are intended), and I'm sure you'll get a resounding "no." Effective teachers aren't in it for the money. And before we bash the greedy teachers, this is your governor's and some task force's proposal. Most good teachers just want students who are ready-to-learn.

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Adirondackal

Jan-15-14 5:16 PM

We all sadly know what King Cuomo II means when HE picks HIS best teachers--union supporters, Democrat activists--nothing more. The Democrats in New York have tried to use the education system as a propaganda machines for years. Fortunately upstate it hasn't worked.

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TiredOfTax

Jan-15-14 5:23 PM

Lets see, great hours, great pay, great benefits, great retirement and enough time off to have a summer job. Oh yeah lets give them some bonus pay too for doing what they are already well compensated to do. Then lets give police a bonus when they give out a bunch of tickets too!

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TiredOfTax

Jan-15-14 5:25 PM

How about the under preforming teachers pay the bonus to the great teachers?

8 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

taxtired

Jan-15-14 5:35 PM

But they will get it. AND say it is for the children when they buy thier new SUV.

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Hilltopper

Jan-15-14 6:28 PM

I would have no problem paying the "highly effective" teacher a 20K bonus if we could pay the "highly ineffective" teacher 20K less. In the past, EIT (Excellence in Teaching) money awarded to a district for that same purpose was bargained by the teachers' union to be divided equally among all teachers, good or bad.

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getreal

Jan-15-14 7:10 PM

How about they just do their jobs!

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BlackFrancis1

Jan-15-14 8:21 PM

NYS requires teachers to obtain a Master's Degree for permanent certification. Teaching is a profession, not a hobby or a "calling". As such, teachers should be compensated relative to their value and what the market will bear. If your district wants to attract good teachers, they better be willing to pay for them. And as far as the hours and summers off - if you are so envious, then you be a teacher. Judging by the comments, many here think anyone could just walk in and do it.

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laker88

Jan-15-14 9:30 PM

Amen Francis....I'd especially like to see Fedup in front of a classroom. He'd be taking back the "over compensated" remark in a hurry.

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Hilltopper

Jan-15-14 10:15 PM

Francis: Paying what the "market" will bear should lead to a cut in salary. For every teacher employed in that profession there are fifty trained in that profession waiting in the wings. Teaching is the only profession that doesn't factor in supply and demand when discussing fair compensation. If you're talking about each teacher negotiating his own salary you're talking about union busting and the end of the world as you know it.

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MrBoB51

Jan-16-14 6:57 AM

Is this what it takes for a lib to embrace Capitalism BF1? 'What the Market will bear' if a Union is involved? Where is that sentiment from liberals regarding the rest of the free market? Nowhere, it's not as convenient to the liberal narrative as this is. Take their union protection away and there will be a lot of bad 'educators' out of work. So, does anyone know whether Teachers work for the Union or the School district because that line has become blurred.

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getreal

Jan-16-14 7:04 AM

Um yes anyone who wants to go to school to become a teacher can do it! They are now!

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BlackFrancis1

Jan-16-14 11:13 AM

Unions are an outdated concept. They were necessary 100 years ago when protections from unsafe working conditions and other unpleasant situations were needed. In today's litigious society, the courts provide ample protection. Unions today are either self-serving or weak, with some exceptions, and do not consistently work for their members' best interests. The teachers'union is one of the exceptions, as they have certainly delivered for their members. Unfortunately, the union also protects ineffective and downright horrible teachers and makes their removal so difficult as to be not worth the effort. I'm in favor of free agency, similar to pro athletes, and then we would get a true indication of an excellent teacher's worth. I admit I have no idea how this would work, nuts and bolts-wise.

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PiedFifer

Jan-16-14 11:40 AM

Why yes, real teachers should get all the bonuses their customers will pay for...on the free market. I read a story of a South Korean teacher who makes 4 million a year running a private education business. "Public education" is a money laundering scheme whose purpose is to buy votes and maintain power. "It's for the children," means, it's for our political buddies who don't want to be bothered winning customers in the private sector.

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FedUp0416

Jan-16-14 11:44 AM

LAKER: The median pay for a high school teacher in Johstown is $52,900 and the median FAMILY income in the Johnstown district is $32,989. The teacher is REQUIRED CONTRACTUALLY to be there 183 days for 7 hours. That works out to $289 per day or $41.28 per hour. The family works 220 days per year for eight hours per day. That works out to $149 per day PER FAMILY or $18.63 per hour PER FAMILY. If you figure 2 earners in a family that brings it down to $9.31 per hour. So yes LAKER, teachers are OVERCOMPENSATED. And I didnt even figure in pension and healthcare. NO 20k BONUS needed!!

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drugsrus

Jan-16-14 11:44 AM

BF1, in the real world "free agency" only works for pro sports guys with agents. Due to the excess number of teachers available, districts would be offering salaries in the $100/week when school is in session area. Except for the ones who have "an inside line" - those people would be offered an excellent compensation package. Typically employers are willing to pay no more than they absolutely have to. And there are people who will work for anything with the "at least I have a job" attitude. Most employers only pay enough so the workers won't quit and most employees only do enough work so they don't get fired.

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BlackFrancis1

Jan-16-14 12:39 PM

I get what you are saying drugs. However in your scenario a school district would be forced to put their money where their mouth is - if they are serious about wanting quality teachers for their children, then they pay the salaries demanded by the top teachers. If they are just paying lip service to the idea of a quality education for their children, then they hire those $100/wk teachers. Either way you have a mechanism for both rewarding excellent teachers and sussing out a school district's true motives.

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Pards13

Jan-16-14 1:41 PM

don't forget the children, they should be ready willing and able to learn. I'm tired of throwing away money on kids that are not willing to learn. They want to screw around do it on their own dime.

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LoyalSocialist

Jan-16-14 3:47 PM

I definitely agree that incentives should be given to someone who is doing exemplary work, but I do not trust the way the state will judge performance. For example: A teacher in Gloversville with a roster of 35 that has over 50% IEP students in it will not perform as well as a teacher in Northville who has 20 students and maybe 10-20% that are IEP. There are too many outside factors that affect teacher performance, thus making this "bonus" completely swayed to teachers in more affluent school districts. The teacher in Gloversville deals with more issues that are family-related and won't even get close to getting any sort of bonus for even their best performance. If parents would stop expecting schools to be babysitters, then maybe it would even the playing field.

4 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

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