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Should New York state allow marijuana use for medical purposes?

  1. Yes
  2. No
 
 
 
 
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(59)

TiredOfTax

Jan-30-14 10:37 PM

According to the doctor, increased cannabis use has contributed to the rise of "amotivational syndrome" and an alarming drop in I.Q. in chronic users.

While alcohol, when consumed in moderation, can potentially be beneficial to your health, the negative effects of marijuana can linger in a user's system for weeks and even permanently impair mental faculties

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TiredOfTax

Jan-21-14 10:26 PM

Please don’t let your dog drink the bong water.

Calls reporting pet poisonings by marijuana have increased by about 30 percent since 2009, from 213 calls that year to 320 in 2013, according to the Animal Poison Control Center, a division of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Those calls probably represent only a fraction of poisonings related to cannabis.

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TiredOfTax

Jan-21-14 1:21 PM

The National Drug Control Policy’s official stance, posted on the whitehouse.gov website, says the opposite of Mr. Obama on all counts. For example, as documented in agency reports, marijuana smoke has significantly more carcinogens than tobacco smoke. And as reported by the government’s National Institute on Drug Abuse, adolescent use of marijuana does something that alcohol does not; it causes permanent brain damage, including lowering of I.Q. Taxpayers have spent billions of dollars warning about drugs, often about marijuana, but these efforts were dramatically undercut by the president’s comments. Mr. Obama might as well have rolled that money into a joint and smoked it on national television.

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TiredOfTax

Jan-20-14 10:22 PM

marijuana affects your reflexes, hindering your motor skills. So marijuana-related car fatalities are not unheard of. And one study found marijuana users have a 4.8-fold increase in risk of a heart attack during the first hour after smoking because of the drug's effect on your heart rate.

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TiredOfTax

Jan-20-14 10:20 PM

Smoking marijuana is more dangerous than smoking cigarettes, experts say. The tar in joints contains a much higher concentration of the chemicals linked to lung cancer compared with tobacco tar. And smoking marijuana deposits four times more tar in the lungs than smoking an equivalent amount of tobacco, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. High doses of marijuana can also cause temporary psychotic reactions, such as hallucinations and paranoia in some people. Younger people with a family history of schizophrenia are at a higher risk of developing the disorder after using marijuana, seven studies showed.

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taxtired

Jan-15-14 5:52 PM

tot; You sound VERY self centered.

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drugsrus

Jan-15-14 3:08 PM

TOT, I'm usually with you on most topics. We are on opposite sides of the fence on this one. THC (the active ingredient in marijuana) does have some medicinal benefits that no other chemical offers. While your position on this has value, it is your opinion - and opinions are never "wrong". I think you just need to look at the whole picture. Many other states already allow medicinal use. It is time to reluctantly allow that in the Peoples' Republic of New Yawk

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TiredOfTax

Jan-15-14 2:04 PM

Every aspect. If you agree you are right if you do not, you continue to be wrong... PERIOD!

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MrBoB51

Jan-15-14 9:51 AM

The aspect, I think, is 'be true to thyself'.

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taxtired

Jan-14-14 8:05 PM

tot; You are right in what aspect???

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TiredOfTax

Jan-14-14 7:33 PM

I do not mind if it goes to 99% I am satisfied knowing that I am right... no matter how many people get it wrong!

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getreal

Jan-13-14 7:16 AM

Alcohol is legal, why not marijuana? They both do damage to peoples minds and bodies!

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revoltnow

Jan-12-14 3:22 AM

70% now...

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revoltnow

Jan-12-14 3:21 AM

well, as far as med. goes. does it matter what drug gives the patient relief? if John Dope.. buy's 120 pills. where does that cash go? right. oversees to a shell corp. no taxes paid at all. this we allready have seen. and it's not gonna stop anytime soon...john dope buy's a bag of weed. the $ stay's right here... all of it. tax or no tax..

so. med. purposses. yes. recreational. it's not for everyone. just 64% of us...

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TiredOfTax

Jan-11-14 7:26 PM

Still a big fat NO! Corruption is rampant enough already even without the dope!

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MrBoB51

Jan-11-14 3:43 PM

It's deja vu all over again! Party now, pay later. Someday people with 'good intentions' are going to have to start thinking out you're 'feel-goodies' to their (usually) disastrous results. Screw good intentions and start thinking will ya?

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MrBoB51

Jan-11-14 3:33 PM

Speaking of cash, there's an interesting twist to this legalization State by State and that is the Fed Banking and Drug Laws. Under the Fed Law, pot is a Sch.1 Drug right along L*S*D, opium etc. Banking Laws prohibit Banking Institutions from handling drug money in any form so new business are finding it almost impossible to open Business accounts. For now some States Business' are finding creative ways around the problem but without a real paper trail how do the States know they're getting the right Tax Revenue?? Legal or not, Banks are not participating in this. What now?

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revoltnow

Jan-11-14 12:32 PM

cash is what every politician prefers. no paper trail. just make sure no cameras see them pick up there cut.

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Hilltopper

Jan-11-14 11:59 AM

D_I_N_K_s

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Hilltopper

Jan-11-14 11:58 AM

Don't forget the *****..... Dual Income No Kids.

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MrBoB51

Jan-11-14 7:59 AM

Uh, that would be the baaad word h*a*s*h*i*s*h.

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MrBoB51

Jan-11-14 7:56 AM

Anna, I love you like a sister but it's 60's 'hippies' and then the 70's 'yuppies' which stands for 'young, upwardly-mobile persons' and yes, most smoked dope. By the way, we of the 60's generation did not invent pot, in fact, not a day went by when the the great Louis Armstrong wasn't stoned and history records ******* use as both medicinal and recreational as far back as the 3rd Millennia BC and we're arguing about it NOW?? There's gotta be something more compelling on the docket.

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drugsrus

Jan-11-14 12:08 AM

amazing TOT, and cash transactions are easily hidden. A little on the dumb side when the Fed doesn't allow small businesses to cash checks for fear of "hiding" income. You would think the gov't would welcome credit card transactions for the paper trail. But on the topic the answer is yes. A few years ago a major pharmaceutical company tried to put the THC in a pill form. I don't think it worked the way they wanted it to or expected it to.

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TiredOfTax

Jan-10-14 8:18 PM

Colorado has sold more than $5 million in pot in the first five days of legalized sales.

The only problem? Retailers aren't allowed to put the money in any federally regulated banks, thanks to legislation designed to prevent drug dealers from laundering money. That means that the entire marijuana industry in Colorado has to be conducted in cash transactions. Aside from being incredibly inconvenient, it exposes the industry to infiltration or targeting by criminals.

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TiredOfTax

Jan-10-14 7:40 PM

If you just signed a controversial law what would you say? Yup just like Obama and the healthcare bill... ain't it all just wonderful?

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