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County panel neutral on city zoning proposal

August 23, 2013
By MICHAEL ANICH , The Leader Herald

JOHNSTOWN - The Fulton County Planning Board on Tuesday remained neutral on a proposed Gloversville Common Council zoning amendment limiting the number of units in new multiple-family dwellings in residential areas.

The board voted on the Gloversville issue during its required state General Municipal Law reviews of several projects in the county.

County Senior Planner Sean Geraghty said the council is proposing a "text amendment" adding language to the city's zoning ordinance.

Article Photos

The Fulton County Planning Board discusses a Gloversville zoning amendment at its meeting Tuesday at the Fort Johnstown Annex. (The Leader-Herald/Michael Anich)

The change stipulates new multi-family dwellings in R-1 residential districts can have no more than four dwelling units per building.

A nine-month moratorium on new multiple-family dwellings being built in residential districts expired in June. City officials said rather than extend the moratorium, they are considering the law to provide a more permanent solution.

Geraghty said the Gloversville Common Council says this proposed change will more accurately reflect the "character of the neighborhoods" zoned under an R-1 classification in the city.

Gloversville has been waiting for action by the county planning board. The city Planning Board on Aug. 6 recommended the council not pass the proposed law.

Gloversville Mayor Dayton King previously said city residents have told him they don't want more projects like the new 48-unit Overlook Ridge Apartments, affordable housing recently built by Kinderhook Development near the Northern Terrace and Lee Avenue neighborhood.

The city Planning Board said it wouldn't benefit the city to eliminate similar future residential development because of one bad experience.

Geraghty told the county Planning Board the zoning amendment would affect about 1,000 acres in R-1 residential districts. County officials said there's not enough of a regional concern to merit either approval or disapproval of the city's application to the county.

"I don't see any regional impact here," said board member Timothy Munn.

Michael Anich can be reached at manich@leaderherald.com.

 
 

 

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