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Parents hear about standards

November 5, 2013

JOHNSTOWN — Several hundred parents packed the local BOCES?campus Thursday to get more information about the new Common Core educational standards, but some parents said after the event they still......

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(52)

drugsrus

Nov-05-13 11:16 AM

Common Core is 1930s Germany Nazi indoctrination of the youth. Low standards to advance the collective.

An educated and informed society is the enemy of the state

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allhopeisgone

Nov-05-13 11:30 AM

Here is a radical idea. How about school year is extended to all 12 months and teachers join the workforce and work more than 180 days.Then our students would not waste first quater reviewing and might actually get ahead.

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Adirondackal

Nov-05-13 1:00 PM

Truth is it is CUOMO core. Secular humanism spiced with political correctness and complete compliance.

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drugsrus

Nov-05-13 1:19 PM

Adirondackal, open your eyes Common Core is national in scope. Barry Soetoro want to be the dictator of this country he hates so much. With Soros' money behind his gang, they are doing everything they can to abolish the Constitution, They are rewriting the history books to enhance the collective view.

The founders would have been shooting long ago

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Annarondac

Nov-05-13 1:56 PM

Probably just an anecdotal observation, but in 1956 New York State began consolidation of schools by closing down one room school houses. Back in the day, schools had a principle, a secretary, a nurse and maybe a guidance councilor. Teachers made their own agendas. The only tests that were standardized were Regents exams. Seems that people who went to these schools turned out pretty well. Look what we have today. Kids, medicated, ADD, bad language, swearing, no respect for adults. I'm not sure government is the best way to educate.

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adkgirl

Nov-05-13 4:55 PM

No, here I a radical idea. Stop spouting the age-old blame the lazy teachers nonsense. That is actually a lazy argument. Teachers are more "I the workforce" than anyone I know. My friend gets to school 6:45 a.m., works with students through planning period and lunch and every available minute of the day. Add to the list: photocopying, phone calls, emails, teacher web pages, plans, correcting, grades, interim reports, SLOs, keep up with new technology. Since they are busy presenting all day, that leaves evenings and weekends to do everything else. My friend brings work home every night and every weekend. Either Sat. or Sunday involves 4-6 hours of schoolwork. She would LOVE an 8-5 job where nights and weekends are hers. Sadly, teachers can work hard day and night but they cannot MAKE students come to school, pay attention, or do their work. People can keep blaming the ills of the world on teachers, but that is not going to solve anything.

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adkgirl

Nov-05-13 4:58 PM

Sorry--everywhere I wrote "is" or "in", only "I" was recorded. I graduated in the 80s and felt I received a great education. The teachers and schools are still dedicated. We have to look at other factors of society that have changed!

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MrBoB51

Nov-05-13 5:14 PM

Drugs, this is the result of States blindly accepting TARP money during the mostly disastrous Bush Admin.. a caveat of which was accepting Common Core Standards. Now parents have choices to make; Home School if you can, a Private or Parochial school if you're willing to sacrifice to afford it or a non-union Charter School. Any one of those choices will be better for your children than public schools controlled by secularist's, atheist's and 'anything goes' union progressive/liberals. It's up to you, you're not at stake but your children are. You may not believe in Marxism and dismiss my opinion, some might say, as the rantings of an old man but the collective believes in you and wants your children.

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adkgirl

Nov-05-13 5:17 PM

Schools can be open with teachers present 24-7/12 months of year. But, guess what? The kids need to be there! It is only the 10th week of school and there are students who already have 20 absences (or more). One student took a week off to babysit with the parent's blessings. Never made up the work. Another student got a doctor to write a note that she has "school phobia" so she does not attend. But, she is seen tanning, at athletic games, at the prom, etc. The world and its values has gone crazy. Students need to do what they are supposed to Sept.-June, THEN we can talk about extending the school day and year! The way things are currently, we will just have more of the same for more days if we extend. Extended school day and year are not a magic panacea until we solve other problems. If dentist offices were open 24-7 would people have fewer cavities? NO! Dentist cannot make people come in, cannot make them brush and floss, etc. Schools have same constraints.

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adkgirl

Nov-05-13 5:24 PM

Mr. Bob--With all due respect, people better hope that public schools survive. After Katrina, the only schools that came back in New Orleans were privates and charters. They can "cherry" pick and God forbid if your child is a behavior problem or special needs. These schools will NOT accept the children. Public schools have to accept all children and find a way to meet their needs. I find it funny how individuals and journalists think that the unions have so much power. The teachers have the least power and get everything crammed down their throats. No one listens to them or asks them before they set policy. Everyone just plays politics with education at the expense of children.

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MrBoB51

Nov-05-13 5:31 PM

Adkgirl, I graduated in 1969. I have watched the Education system slowly become what it is today, an evolution to the soft bigotry of low expectations. The teachers may be dedicated but are learning and then teaching to wrong ideas and lessons that led to this breakdown and continue to teach and reinforce bad policies. Otherwise everybody would embrace Common Core as new and wonderful but they're not.

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MrBoB51

Nov-05-13 5:35 PM

If the Unions were not so powerful, teachers would not get anything shoved down their throats. Go ahead, try to be a non union teacher in a Union controlled system.

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Hilltopper

Nov-05-13 5:39 PM

adkgirl: You paint a bleak picture of the day to day life of a teacher. I wonder why once in the profession you never hear of a teacher quitting to take an easier job. Please explain. Also, I'm happy to hear that you got a great education in the 80's. Did you ever try to take that education into a private sector job and leave a job you say s-u-c-k—s ? My teacher friends tell me that with proper time management there is no reason to take work home. If that is the case, file a grievance to get paid for all the hours of work you take home.

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Hilltopper

Nov-05-13 5:45 PM

On the tv news coverage of the common core presentations I heard two different parents say that, although they were good at math, they could not do their first grade child's math homework. Could someone please give an example of the first grade math questions that the parents could not answer?

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adkgirl

Nov-05-13 5:47 PM

Hilltopper: I rarely post on this site because I see what is written. #1: Life as a teacher is not "bleak". If people have not been in a school system lately, they do not know what goes on. And I never said the job "*****". Don't put words in my mouth. And, yes, teachers quit all the time. Two teachers quit last year, even though they did not have the years or age. Also, many teachers make it 3-4 years then make a career change. In G'ville schools years ago, a retired GE worker thought he would get a job as science teacher, thinking that would be "easy" after his GE job; he did not last. He was not prepared for all the complexities of education, kids, families. As far as your friend not taking work home, it depends what people teach. If someone teaches English 11, there is ONE lesson plan to do. Staff who teach 5 different classes have 5 sets of lesson plans, interims reports, grades, teacher web pages, etc. You have to do the job to unders

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adkgirl

Nov-05-13 5:57 PM

MrBob: I think we can agree on some things! I feel like I received a common SENSE education, rather than this common CORE nonsense. Have you ever googled the "pineapple" question that was on the middle school state exams last year? There is NO sense to be made of that question and yet students and teachers were evaluated on it. Then investigate Pearson and the other companies who are making $$$$ on this common core and high stakes standardized testing.

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allhopeisgone

Nov-05-13 6:05 PM

I did not say "lazy teachers" although there is plenty of that. What I am saying is the system is archaic, we no longer need summers off, a week here and a week there. Textbooks are no longer needed, use laptops for all students. I don't want to heear about how much time spent on teacher web pages and photocopying...is that really an argument? 9-5 monday through friday. The amount needed to learn has expanded, and yes the teachers union has fought any expansion of the workday or school year. If you expand both the people who really wana be teacher will be there like they were before teachers got 100k and incentives to take basket weaving college courses. If America is gonna compete than we have to do what the other countries do and have full year school.

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adkgirl

Nov-05-13 6:12 PM

It is really not even worth replying. Teachers cannot take basket weaving and I do not know anyone who makes $100K. You are going to believe what you want and do not want to be confused by the facts. I would believe in trimesters like some colleges do, but again, for what, if students do not attend or do what they are supposed to do. More hours and days mean nothing. And, kids can keep themselves ahead over the summer. Schools cannot and should not do everything. As a youth, I participated in 4-H, Scouts, Church and Sunday school activities, music lessons, chores, etc. My PARENTS made sure I stayed educated. Imagine...

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JoePhillip

Nov-05-13 6:23 PM

Massachusetts has had the common core standards for ten years? That's a new one, since their adoption across the country began in 2010. Massachusetts has done a nice job training their kids to take tests since 1993 with the introduction of the MCAS, however, their remediation rate at college is the same rate as ours, which is the same rate since measurement of college student remediation began in the early 1970s. When business leaders start making claims about how poor our schools are, be suspect, and find the data from the state and national departments of education. You may be surprised at what you find.

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laker88

Nov-05-13 6:29 PM

How is citing the tired old 180 day stat relevant?? In Europe the average is around 160 days. Why are many European countries pulling ahead?...because of the weird philosophy that a priority in schools is academics...sports and extras are great, but should be done outside the school. Also, around the age of 15, students aren't forced into academia but can choose the technology route if they so desire.

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Hilltopper

Nov-05-13 6:38 PM

Joe: "their remediation rate at college is the same rate as ours, which is the same rate since measurement of college student remediation began in the early 1970s". Could you please provide a link to that data? NBC Nightly news did a story saying that Mass. ranked #1 in the country, and if it was a country their 8th graders were 5th in the world in math and 2nd in science behind S. Korea. What about high expectations, 100% student dedication, and doing whatever it takes, in and out of school to be the best? Or is that only for football?

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Hilltopper

Nov-05-13 6:47 PM

Laker: "Also, around the age of 15, students aren't forced into academia but can choose the technology route if they so desire." This makes perfect sense. Why then do all schools push college as the only path to success?

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adkgirl

Nov-05-13 6:50 PM

Boy, is that right. College is NOT the be all, end all. The age of the trades is 65 and over. Students need to be prepared/exposed to the apprenticeships as much as college. Or entrepreneurship or other avenues.

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getreal

Nov-05-13 7:00 PM

ADK...you keep talking about the kids who don't show up in school, what about the kids who do, why are their test scores not up to par?

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yukonjack

Nov-05-13 7:03 PM

I see a lot of blame going around but nothing about parents..? Picture a pie chart ...20 % of pie is for teachers .They have a set amount of work to teach the kids..30% of the pie is parents..They need to provide a home and nutrition for the kids to be ready tto learn.The rst of the pie is the kids.If they are given the tools to learn they should to well...BUT if parents drop the ball,too large a % of families are broken....The kids fail ..

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