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Parents hear about standards

November 5, 2013

JOHNSTOWN — Several hundred parents packed the local BOCES?campus Thursday to get more information about the new Common Core educational standards, but some parents said after the event they still......

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(52)

drugsrus

Nov-06-13 4:01 PM

yeah, I know how that is 'topper. I couldn't even verify the husband's first name of a new roommate at the rehab place my wife is in. Turns out I've known the guy for about 30 yrs. But when I asked nobody would give me an answer except to say "HIPPA". But as I said things can be "found out" -- Geez - you need to get out more and stop worrying about how people know stuff. Just accept that they know it, like you accept the liar in chief's tall tales.

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MyHeadHurtz

Nov-06-13 3:33 PM

It absolutely begins at home. Drive to any of the schools at arrival/dismissal time, and you will see all of the "important" parents who can't even follow something simple as No Parking, Bus Zone, etc. Signs are right there, but these parents either can't read or just choose not to follow the rules. I don't care what you say, kids pick up on that, and think "well if my parents don't have to follow rules, why should I?"I know the police are too busy to issue tickets, so maybe the LH should take pictures of the offending cars and publish in the papers as a public shaming. Probably not though, wouldn't want to hurt anyone's feelings.

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Hilltopper

Nov-06-13 3:17 PM

Druggy: An employee on sick leave at FFCS had someone leak their medical information and the negotiated settlement cost the district over $100K. All healthcare providers are aware of the law and a violation results in termination of employment. The information should not get past the school nurse or physican, not even to the BOE.

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adkgirl

Nov-06-13 2:54 PM

The student herself told everyone. She did not come to school. Staff had to send her assignments home. She was also provided a tutor at taxpayer expense and quite often would not open the door for the tutor.

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drugsrus

Nov-06-13 2:09 PM

Hill, just accept that that kind of stuff happens. HIPPA goes w-a-y over that line of privacy, but sometimes you find a real person who will tell you what you want to know.

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Hilltopper

Nov-06-13 1:44 PM

adkgirl: "Another student got a doctor to write a note that she has "school phobia" so she does not attend. But, she is seen tanning, at athletic games, at the prom, etc" I would be interested to know how you got this information in light of HIPAA and the confidentiality of medical records.

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drugsrus

Nov-06-13 12:33 PM

adkgirl, trailer parks are like urban school districts, they get a bad name for just being, I live in a nice park and it is far from what the perception is. The good news is that you didn't use those circumstances as the crutch that it would be used as today. Congratulations on your success in many ways, you may be one of the last to really "get it". I tip my hat to you

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adkgirl

Nov-06-13 12:04 PM

Thank you for your patience reading my views on this topic. I actually am a product of public education. My parents divorced, I grew up in 3 trailer parks, attended public K-12 school and attended two state schools for college. I was the first/only person in my family to attend college. I have a HS teacher to thank for even suggesting I try college. I guess we need to find the formula as to why some students persevere. I'm not trying to pat myself on the back. There was a good show on NPR Sunday about "gritty" students who have the tools to persevere and become successful.

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drugsrus

Nov-06-13 11:21 AM

A note to the rest of the people - 40+ posts (many from a great new voice - adkgirl) explaining factually the true worthlessness of Common Core to the children and its nature of indoctrination - NO THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOXLLOWED , No problem solving skills taught. Even Barry Soetoro Jr, Cuomo is on board with it.

Power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely-- stand up and fight or be led to the slaughter houses sheeple

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drugsrus

Nov-06-13 11:08 AM

THANK YOU adkgirl, all this proves what I have been saying. -- An educated informed society is the enemy of the state. -- Parents need to get more involved, the future of this country rests in your lap , unless you would rather end up in a communist socialist state, DEMAND that this be turned around

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MrBoB51

Nov-06-13 10:05 AM

Adkgirl, you make some very good points. If I may, you read like a girl who did not receive a higher 'public' education. Teaching to critical thinking methods have been abandoned in Public education for long time, so today's teachers are not equipped to pass on that skill and it becomes more obvious as time goes on. That was my original point.

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adkgirl

Nov-06-13 5:58 AM

Sorry--one more point. At Albany's Tech Valley High (check out their website), students are taught using 21st C, project-based learning. One of my friends visited. A bright girl explained that it took her 3 times to pass one of her regents exams. Under Cuomo's definition, her teachers and school are considered "failing". But, who would you rather hire? A student who can spit back info. by filling in little bubbles on a test, or the student who can critically think, problem solve, collaborate? Under Cuomo's definition, Tech Valley High deserves a "death sentence" (those were Cuomo's words earlier this year).

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adkgirl

Nov-06-13 5:33 AM

sorry, typos. schoolS and entitleD

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adkgirl

Nov-06-13 5:32 AM

Another thing to keep in mind: school are not the problem. Schools are a reflection of society. Area business leaders were recently lamenting that they can't find qualified people to hire in Mont. and Fulton Co. b/c of SOFT skills! Can't pass the drug screening, poor work ethic, etc. This is the same thing schools are seeing. Whether students or adults, there seems to be a culture of wanting something for nothing. People feel entitle to receive a good grade or job regardless of the amount of work they put into it. People who run apprenticeships are complaining about the same. The participants do not show up, or they show up late, do not possess perseverance, etc.

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adkgirl

Nov-06-13 5:15 AM

DrugsRUs: Since APPR is rating teacher on student test scores, teachers are forced to teach to the test. No creative projects that teach students to problem solve and critically think. And, there is really no preparation, students or teachers could do to be ready for the "pineapple" question. Google that one and try to figure it out. Plus, under APPR, teachers can make their own pretest, then teach their course content all year, then someone ELSE must create the final exam, give it, and score it. That someone else does not know what was taught and what should be measured. Who could make that up????

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JoePhillip

Nov-05-13 10:00 PM

Today's teachers are told what to teach by the pressures of the recent past test scores. Standardized tests of yesteryear were not the problem they are today, because they were developed and tested and validated by people with an interest in measurement and diagnostics, not profit. The tests today, as well as the "cure" for the poor results, the "fix-it-all" curricular materials, and the magic bullet staff development, are all developed by for-profit companies who can only make money by designing poor tests and the "fixes" for these tests the following school year. It's a great business model, but it's doing our kids and our public education system extraordinary damage. Why do you think parents and teachers are not allowed to see the tests after they are given?

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drugsrus

Nov-05-13 8:30 PM

Hill, standardized testing is one thing, BUT "back in the (our) day" we learned the course. The test was a formality. Today teachers teach to the test to get better scores. They complain that these test take away time from teaching the subject -HUH ?-- IF the kiddies learned the subject the test would be a real "yardstick", but we (you included) were taught to think. They don't teach that anymore.

Who pulled my chain??

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drugsrus

Nov-05-13 8:23 PM

got a little side tracked, w-o-r-k has never been seen by academia as a place for students to end up. As an early baby-boomer most of our parents never went to college. In Fulton County, even as late as the 1950s a HS graduating girl was academically ready for a book keeping job or a secretarial position at one of the mills, or she went to nursing school. Guys got jobs in the mills, looked forward to retirement and a week or two vacation at Caroga Lake. Life cycle complete.

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Hilltopper

Nov-05-13 8:16 PM

Joe: From grade school to college boards, from LSATs and MCATs, from law boards and medical board exams, they are all designed to test proficiency and yield comparative results. How do you compare without a standardized test? If the test proves to be difficult you are graded on a curve and your percentile score is the relevant score.

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drugsrus

Nov-05-13 8:10 PM

Tradesmen (carpenters, plumbers, machinists, carpenters, et al) are sorely needed, but they all need more than basic math skills. They also need to be able to communicate effectively.

If anybody has noticed the penmanship of many of the dolts that got diplomas over the last few years, it is no wonder that "they" want to drop teaching cursive writing.

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drugsrus

Nov-05-13 8:06 PM

laker, wow another thread where we are on the same side. Hill, "they" have always pushed academics and the need of a degree. But where they fail is that Regents academics is really needed in many of the trades. I used trig and solid geometry on a regular basis in my machinist career. Chemistry was also a big help, as was physics and I still use all those years in the language arts every day (OK lots of it here making my posts readable), which included reading comprehension (really understanding what it is you are reading). (con't)

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Hilltopper

Nov-05-13 7:58 PM

Laker: "Thus you had students wasting their time in meaningless academic courses." More importantly they were wasting the teacher's time and s-ucking the life out of the class because of the effort it takes to get them "over the bar". Twenty years ago when my kids were in school this was the problem and today it still is the problem. Bright kids are left looking out the window while the teacher has to break it down again and again for the challenged students, those who can't do it or don't want to do it.

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JoePhillip

Nov-05-13 7:54 PM

Yes, Hilltopper. Go to the US Dept of Education National Center for Education Statistics. There is a wide variety of data, including longitudinal data dealing with remediation. Also, a paper titled "The American Freshman: 40 Years of Trends" by Pryor, et.al. contains some interesting charts on pages 20 and 21. The whole paper is interesting. Now, you cite NBC News, but have you seen the tests that made Massachusetts #1. Until you know exactly what is being tested, the results should be meaningless. Again, kids are way more complex than a number assigned to them on one day of testing. Gaming the system doesn't equal education. And if you want to go the test score route, if we took the scores of the top 10% socioeconomic students ACROSS THE WHOLE COUNTRY, the entire US is #1. I think there's much more to the story than CCSS will ever fix.

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drugsrus

Nov-05-13 7:54 PM

get real, because they only go there because they have to. They aren't prepared to learn. Surprise, teachers do not teach, students learn. Having been there secondary education (high school) is more like adolescent day care. Discipline is zilch, you can't hurt their feelings, everything is about self esteem.

adkgirl, you seem to have a great grasp of this subject matter and are on the right side of the argument.

'topper, you have been reading usedto and GetAClue too much how about following Glenn Beck's advice on all his topics -" Don't believe me, do your own research"

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adkgirl

Nov-05-13 7:18 PM

Are you kidding me? Yes, teachers are paid to teach. But if a student doesn't "get it", then the student needs to stay for extra help. My friend offers to stay with students and to give credit back on assignments and test but kids say they don't have time to stay. parents let kids take the entire day off school to take their 10 minute permit test and to take their road test. My parents did not let me miss one day of school.

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