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Op-Ed Columns

A chink in Trump’s armor

By Jules Witcover Those gaping empty balcony seats at President Trump’s Tulsa campaign rally last weekend sent an unexpected chill through Trump World. The failure to fill the facility’s 19,000 capacity, and the resultant abandonment of a makeshift outside venue to handle an overflow that ...

Farewell, Teddy

By Kathleen Parker As beauty exists in the eye of the beholder, so does the ugliness of a statue. Latest to the list of soon-to-be fallen monuments is one of President Theodore Roosevelt, who has presided over the entrance to New York’s American Museum of Natural History for the past ...

How long will it last?

By PATRICK J. BUCHANAN The left’s war on America’s past crossed several new frontiers last week. Portland’s statue of George Washington, the Father of his Country and the first president of the United States, the greatest man of his age, was toppled and desecrated. While the statue ...

Toxic in Tulsa

By Cal Thomas President Trump’s speech Saturday night in Tulsa, Oklahoma, was a toxic stream of consciousness that ignored a great opportunity to speak words of healing and unity to a divided nation. His remarks, which lasted nearly two hours, were full of self-justifications and salted ...

The superior path to November

By FROMA HARROP What didn’t happen in Tulsa last weekend was gratifying and a relief. The protests against racism were overwhelmingly orderly. President Donald Trump’s rally also proceeded without serious incident and, notably, without much of an audience. And this didn’t happen for ...

Trump’s war on the media

By Jules Witcover Donald Trump’s election campaign, unnerved by the latest CNN poll showing him trailing prospective Democratic president nominee Joe Biden by 14 percentage points, is threatening to sue the cable news network. The campaign alleges the poll fails to reflect Trump’s strong ...

Bad cops — bad unions

By JOHN STOSSEL For my internet video this week, my staff showed me clips of violent cops. It’s not just Derek Chauvin kneeling on George Floyd’s neck for almost nine minutes — it’s the other cops who just watch. It’s the Buffalo cops who floored a protester and simply walked by ...

Congress did something it was unaware of

By GEORGE F. WILL “[T]he limits of the drafters’ imagination supply no reason to ignore the law’s demands.” — Justice Neil Gorsuch on Monday Monday illustrated the limited usefulness of the political labels that often are carelessly bandied: The four Supreme ...

Let’s not forget our past

Jefferson City News-Tribune June 14 Students at the University of Missouri again are petitioning to remove the Thomas Jefferson statue from the Columbia campus, though university officials have said they will not remove it. Jefferson, after all, was a slave owner who fathered children with ...

Self-inflicted fiasco

By KATHLEEN PARKER When the New York Times’ leadership recently apologized to the paper’s staff for running an op-ed by Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., the enemies of “fake news” high-fived and Free Speech collapsed from embarrassment. Heaven forbid an opinion on a newspaper’s op-ed page ...

The Left-wing lockdown

By BETSY MCCAUGHEY Three months ago, America was told to trust public health experts. Never again. Most of them have revealed themselves to be left-wing ideologues cloaked in the mantle of science. On their advice, states slammed their economies shut, put 40 million people out of work, sent ...

More discussion about race is needed

By MIKE MYERS Perceptions are everything to us. Reality doesn’t matter as much as what we believe it to be. That’s a key to race relations. Another factor we seem to be overlooking right now is that the problem with many black Americans’ mistrust of law enforcement personnel starts ...

How can they be called good cops?

By Leonard Pitts For two weeks now, outrage has convulsed America: pundits, preachers, protesters, and at least one “severely conservative” GOP senator all raising their voices to condemn police brutality. Yet, here’s the startling truth: No one has made a stronger case against the ...

Let them risk their lives

By JOHN STOSSEL Deaths from COVID-19 are dropping, but we probably can’t resume normal life until someone develops a vaccine. Experts say it will take at least 12 to 18 months. Why so long? Because to make sure a vaccine works, researchers must recruit lots of volunteers and wait for ...

Romney didn’t win, did he?

By Jonah Goldberg “Romney didn’t win, did he?” That was former Senate Democratic majority leader Harry Reid’s response to whether he regretted lying about then-GOP presidential nominee — and now Utah senator — Mitt Romney. Reid accused Romney on the Senate floor in 2012, when ...

Joe, just say Amy

By KATHLEEN PARKER It is rarely a good idea to make campaign promises that put you in a box or could go very wrong, as nearly every president can attest. Joe Biden must have skipped that chapter in the campaign how-to handbook. He’s now stuck with vows to appoint women and minorities to ...

A marketing decision

By Jonah Goldberg The first thing to remember about vice presidential picks is that they are marketing decisions. That is, once a candidate has been deemed qualified to be president, the only thing that matters is what the choice says about the person at the top of the ticket. It wasn’t ...

With death toll mounting, Trump keeps tweeting

By Leonard Pitts Always before, there have been words. Always before, someone crafted them with writerly skill and gave them to the president to give to us. Always, before. When seven people died aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger, President Ronald Reagan spoke of how, just that morning, ...

A different candidate

By JOHN STOSSEL We have a choice! Next presidential election, we don’t have to decide between two big-spending candidates, neither of whom has expressed much interest in limited government. Now, we have a third serious choice. This week, Dr. Jo Jorgensen, a psychology lecturer at ...

Economic recovery and Congress

By GEORGE F. WILL From the University of Chicago’s Becker Friedman Institute — named for Milton Friedman and Gary Becker, two of the university’s 30 Nobel laureates in economics — comes this warning: Recovery from the pandemic’s economic damage will be protracted and perhaps made ...