Officials planning electrical upgrade

Tryon Tech. to undergo improvements

PERTH — Fulton County officials have been planning this summer at the Tryon Technology Park for an eventual major electrical upgrade for the site.

“That’s where we have been focusing,” county Planning Director Scott Henze said Wednesday.

Fulton County and the Fulton County Industrial Development Agency, the latter being the owner of the park, have been working with National Grid to provide primary electrical service to the site. The Planning Department submitted information to the utility on new electric service for a wastewater pump station, water booster station, and an elevated tank.

Henze said National Grid is currently finalizing a cost estimate for this major electrical upgrade at Tryon.

“We met with them a couple times,” he said.

The planning official said that Fulton County submitted a Consolidated Funding Application to the state seeking funding for the Tryon electric upgrade project.

Henze said his department also submitted a proposed $600,000 capital plan project for 2019 related to the upgrade. The Fulton County Board of Supervisors’ Capital Projects Committee meets next at 1:30 p.m. Aug. 30 at the County Office Building.

Meanwhile, Henze said there hasn’t been too many business leads at Tryon. State-sanctioned medical marijuana manufacturer Vireo Health remains the sole tenant of the park.

Henze said his department reviewed Vireo Health’s site plan amendment going through the town of Perth for its pharmaceutical manufacturing facility. He said Vireo Health is proposing a second greenhouse be installed adjacent to the existing greenhouse. The company has been reminded that the landscaping and parking lot improvements that were part of the original site plan approval have yet to be completed.

All buildings that officials wanted demolished as part of Tryon’s effort to create about 100 acres of prime development are now down, Henze said. There exists a concrete block that he said the IDA will be working to remove.

Officials say the Fulton County Center for Regional Growth and IDA continue to market Tryon, and the clearing of a shovel-ready designation for business has become increasingly important.

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