Show brings the outdoors indoors

Bob Kazmierski, director of the Wildlife Museum in the town of Ansterdam, is selling gloves and other items as a fundraiser for the museum at the 13th annual Adirondack Outdoorsman Show Saturday at the Moose Lodge in Johnstown. (The Leader-Herald/Eric Retzlaff)

Bob Kazmierski, director of the Wildlife Museum in the town of Ansterdam, is selling gloves and other items as a fundraiser for the museum at the 13th annual Adirondack Outdoorsman Show Saturday at the Moose Lodge in Johnstown. (The Leader-Herald/Eric Retzlaff)

JOHNSTOWN — For Paul Nielsen, the 13th annual Adirondack Outdoorsman Show was like an outing.

A repeat visitor to the event, Nielsen said, “A lot of people I know here. I know hunters and fellow sportsmen.”

“It’s a middle-of-the-winter meeting,” he said after buying edibles from Muddy Trail Jerky Company of Granville.

Keith Timont of Charlton, who was chatting with Ed Drake of D&D Baits and Supplies, said, “I love the outdoors. I love talking with people. You learn a lot.”

“People have been cooped up all winter,” added Drake. “I get a lot of the same people.”

Ed Drake of D&D Baits and Supplies, left, talks with Keith Timont of Charlton at the 13th annual Adirondack Outdoorsman Show Saturday at the Moose Lodge in Johnstown. (The Leader-Herald/Eric Retzlaff)

Ed Drake of D&D Baits and Supplies, left, talks with Keith Timont of Charlton at the 13th annual Adirondack Outdoorsman Show Saturday at the Moose Lodge in Johnstown. (The Leader-Herald/Eric Retzlaff)

The event continues today from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Moose Lodge on Route 30A. This year’s program seemed to be doing at least as well as last year’s, said coordinator Mike Hauser. Cold and snow put somewhat of a damper on the second day last year, he said. People are coming this year as far away as Poughkeepsie, Rensselaer, Delmar and Cobleskill–and that includes a vendor from Kodiak Island, Alaska.

Alaskan Michael Horstman said he travels throughout the United States and even abroad, including Germany, with vintage sporting goods, such as cedar arrows from the 1960s, wooden snowshoes, and wooden ammunition crates.

“I just like going to these events,” he said. “It’s good fun. I visit a lot of people.”

Doug Moody of Bark Eater Bamboo of the town of Providence was a vendor who said he spends hundreds of hours making fly rods from bamboo shoots. He said the British used to have the market cornered with wooden fly rods 14 feet long. Once bamboo began to be used, fly rods could be as short as 5 to 8 1/2 feet, Moody said.

Wayne Calder, retired police officer from Rotterdam, was looking over some long guns with his grandson Jacob Gilmore of Burnt Hills, who attends an archery class in Amsterdam. “I’m trying to show him gun safety,” he said.

Michael Horstman travels around the world to display vintage items, such as cedar arrows from the 1960s, at the 13th annual Adirondack Outdoorsman Show Saturday at the Moose Lodge in Johnstown. (The Leader-Herald/Eric Retzlaff)

Michael Horstman travels around the world to display vintage items, such as cedar arrows from the 1960s, at the 13th annual Adirondack Outdoorsman Show Saturday at the Moose Lodge in Johnstown. (The Leader-Herald/Eric Retzlaff)

Several vendors were selling long guns, including F&C Firearms of Stamford, which had three or four tables from which choose from.

Andy Cozzolino Jr. of Gloversville said, “I’m not much of a hunter,” but like fishing a lot especially with live bait. “I’ve been in this fishing thing since I was 2 years old.”

While he said he generally avoids using lures, he bought one last year he really liked and “caught a lot of fish with it.”

The outdoorsman show was the occasion for Dr. Richard “Doc” Maretzo, a member of the Pine Tree Rifle Club in Gloversville, to be awarded a plaque for setting the world record for putting 10 rounds within a 0.119-inch shot group from a benchrest at 100 yards in 1983.

The show also had a replica on display of a northern pike of 52.5 inches and 46.2 pounds caught by Peter Dubuc on Sept. 15, 1940, from the Great Sacandaga Lake. He ate the original fish.

COMMENTS